Art Queer News

London Based Artist, Hormazd Narielwalla, Makes 2D and 3D Collages Out of No longer Needed Tailoring Patterns

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Photo by Denis Laner

Creative and super neat! The first word that comes to my mind when I look at these images of Hormazd Narielwalla‘s collages is ‘delicate.’

Hormazd Narielwalla will be resident artist at Margaret Street Gallery. During his residency he will make a body of work, which will first be presented at Collect, following a solo show in the gallery.

Narielwalla was selected by the Crafts Council, England to exhibit in the Project Space at Collect taking place at Saatchi Gallery, Chelsea London from the 10th – 13th May 2013. The international fair for the contemporary object will house 32 international galleries and 11 independent artists. The Gallery has sponsored his participation along with London College of Fashion and Aura Lingerie. For Collect he will exhibit paper sculptures created from military tailoring patterns from his Love Garden series made in response to his doctorate research degree at London College of Fashion. The artist, whose practice originates in Savile Row, makes unique collage artworks, artist books and illustrations from discarded bespoke suit and shirt patterns of individual customers who are now deceased. Narielwalla is also the author of The Savile Row Cutter, biography of Michael Skinner – Master Tailor of Dege & Skinner.

My starting point is always the tailoring patterns, which become the central focus of the artworks.

For this project Narielwalla worked with historical military patterns of British Army uniforms sourced from tailoring books dating back to 1800. They were used to derive an academic dress narrative of body coat uniforms of the British Raj archived at the National Army Museum. An affirmative association from his adolescence was the authoritative figure of Ashton Pelham-Martyn, an English officer from the British Raj falling in love with Anjuli-Bai, an Indian princess in the forbidden love tale The Far Pavilions. On reflection Narielwalla was always drawn to the masculine formality of uniforms ever since he watched the TV series as a 12-year-old boy. He began to view the military patterns as abstractions of the officer he fantasised about, and created a series of delicate abstract love gardens as he was revisiting that memory having handled the uniforms and the patterns in the archive. The artworks continue an innocent yearning to embrace an ideal form that remains as illusive as it ever was.

About the Artist: In October 2009, Sir Paul Smith presented Narielwalla’s first solo exhibition at his Mayfair gallery. He was also commissioned in 2011 by the Crafts Council, England for their National touring exhibit Block Party, showing along artists Yinka Shonibare, Charlotte Hodes and Dai Rees, curated by artist Lucy Orta. The exhibit also features a film Negative Space on the artists’ experiences in the tailors workroom and archive. Narielwalla is also the author of Dead Man’s Patterns, a limited edition artist book, which was acquired by several art collections around the world including the Rare Modern British Collections at the British Library.

More info on at narielwalla.com

Photo by Denis Laner
Photo by Denis Laner

 

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Photo by Denis Laner
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Photo by Denis Laner
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Photo by Denis Laner
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Photo by Denis Laner

 

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